Environment

First electric concrete mixer truck unveiled by Volvo Trucks paves way for sustainable construction

Who says EVs can’t haul? Volvo Trucks delivered the first fully electric heavy-duty concrete mixer truck to CEMEX this week, paving the way toward sustainable construction.

Volvo Trucks is leading the charge to bring zero-emission heavy-duty electric vehicles to the markets that need them most.

Best known for its world-class transport solutions, Volvo unveiled its first commercial electric truck –the Volvo FL Electric – in 2019, marking the start of an industry revolution.

The FL Electric was followed by the Volvo VNR Electric, which launched in North America in 2020. Building on its success, Volvo introduced three 44-ton electric trucks this past September, some of the heaviest in its lineup, bringing its portfolio to six commercial EV trucks – the industry’s largest.

Volvo’s impressive electric trucks are drawing the attention of top-tier clients including Amazon, which ordered 20 Volvo FH Electric haulers with a 44-ton capacity and up to 186 miles range (300 km).

The leading truck manufacturer has a heavy-duty electric lineup that can operate at a total weight of 16 to 44 tons, designed to cover everything from city distribution and handling to construction transport and regional hauling.

Volvo’s latest zero-emission heavy-duty solution, the FMX electric concrete mixer truck, is a big step toward eliminating emissions in the construction industry.

Volvo-electric-concrete-truck-2
Handover of electric concrete mixer truck (source: Volvo Trucks)

Volvo Trucks unveils first electric concrete mixer

On Thursday, the Volvo FMX electric concrete mixer was handed over to CEMEX, a leading building materials company, in Berlin, Germany.

Volvo says the EV truck will begin operating at a ready-mix concrete plant in Spandau in Berlin this month. The battery electric truck is the latest development from a 2021 agreement to collaborate and develop emissions-free transport.

Here’s a look at the specs:

Volvo Trucks FMX specs
Electric Drivetrain 2 electric motors,
power 330 kW
Batteries 4 batteries,
360 kWh
Gearbox I-Shift
Wheelbase 4.100 m,
Superstructure Concrete mixer,
9m³
Volvo Trucks’ first electric concrete mixer specs

Roger Ann, Volvo Truck’s president, announced the massive milestone, saying:

Together we will work to implement emission-free transport in the construction industry. Our electric trucks are zero emissions and their silent operation also provide a better environment for people working at construction sites, as well as for residents living nearby

The company aims for half of the new truck sales to be electric by 2030 while committing to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions in its value chain by 2040.

Electrek’s Take

Volvo’s latest electric concrete mixer is massive news for the construction industry. Electrifying concrete transportation has been challenging due to the heavy loads and continuous mixing demands, but Volvo Trucks and CEMEX have figured it out.

The construction industry is one of the biggest culprits of toxic CO2 emissions due to the strenuous demands that are required in the industry. However, as battery and other electric technology progress, they will prove to be more capable (and sustainable) than ice-powered equipment.

We are already starting to see battery-electric technology rolling out in mining (check out this 240t electric mining haul truck that can charge in 30 minutes or less, or Caterpillars large 793 electric mining truck) and construction with BEVs like Volvo Trucks FMX electric concrete mixer.

Volvo Trucks is even making trucks with fossil-free fuel. Learn more about it here.

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